Duitsland staat niet zozeer op gespannen voet met Nord Stream II of de Russische Federatie, maar met zichzelf

Mijn reactie op DW News bij een video over de aanleg van Nord Stream II:

‘Mayor Axel Vogt is a strange figure. Is he really that naive, or is he just hired to express an opinion like a stage actor is rehearsing a role? He believes that Alexei Navalny is winning the propaganda battle in Europe against the Kremlin, which has much more resources at its disposal. That must indicate that the Kremlin’s propaganda is unable to sell a bad product, namely its authoritarian regime. But Vogt’s perspective does not reach that far. His perspective turns out to be mired in Nord Stream II alone.

The tragedy of such a blinkered mayor is that he first looks at who his opponent is before forming an opinion about the case itself. That is the tragedy of party politics in its worst form, by the way. The mayor straightens out what’s wrong. Apparently he sees that as his job.

In any case, the attitude of German politics (except for the Greens, the Liberals and some CDU members) towards the Russian Federation is rather distorted and disturbed. This has to do with the Second World War and the suffering caused by the Nazis.

How that can go wrong, President Steinmeier showed when he recently consciously or naively confused the victimization of Balts, Poles, Belarusians and Ukrainians with the victimization of Russians. Professor Timothy Snyder has repeatedly demonstrated to a German audience, inclusief parlementariërs, with figures that Poles, Belarusians and Ukrainians have suffered proportionally more from the German war machine than the Russians.

But those facts do not reach the very top of German politics. Although it is also possible that they do know what victims they have made, but consciously perpetuate the misunderstanding in order to reach a rapprochement with the Kremlin. A rapprochement that on closer inspection is not appropriate, not ethical and not permissible. But this rather disproportionately favors German business at the expense of Eastern and Western Europe. That misunderstanding has marked Germany’s Russia policy since Willy Brandt, with the SPD in the most malicious role of helping the Kremlin, and not Germany or the EU.

The conclusion of the Nord Stream II fuss is not that it is about Germany’s relationship with the Russian Federation, but essentially about Germany’s self-image. That is seriously distorted and clouded. Even 75 years after the war, German politics has not yet properly processed that war. Or as said, and what is even more false and poignant, it has processed that war, but deliberately misinterprets it for opportunistic reasons.

This not only alienates Germany even further from the real victims of World War II, such as Poland, Belarus and Ukraine, as well as France and the Netherlands, but with that false self-image it also does itself considerable damage because it knowingly deceives itself.’